Dating a dangelico

Rated 4.58/5 based on 972 customer reviews

I'm not sure if this one started out as an electric, but it ended up as one, and it does have the typical electric-style headstock.

Allegedly stolen in 1970, from this guy: sure John Dangelicos shop was a repair shop as well .

I think of these more like ES-350s, or 175s, but with a pedigree.

Also...neck is an important part of a tone engine, especially on an amplified electric guitar.

Most bodies were maple laminated, and a lot were flamed like crazy.

Often called G7s, it seems likely that is the notation by the body supplier, and not by D'Angelico. First is mine: This one looks like it might be spruce, and the body is shaped a little different than most.

Angled bridge pickup...sure if it had a neck pickup, tailpiece replaced by a Bigsby...you're going to play Stooges covers on a guitar that's arguably on the level of a Stradivarius, this would be your first choice. I'm still looking for a clean photo of Joe Beck's...had a unique headstock shape (open book) I'd love if anyone else has photos or comments to share about these rare red-headed step children.

Were these laminated bodies pressed and formed according to D'Angelico's design and specifications or were they bog-standard ones with a D'Angelico neck grafted on each of them?Super flamey single pickup, older style tailpiece: ignore this one...it's an Excel that someone electrified. I love this one, although the concept would make many cringe I'm sure.Last seen in Japan, this beauty has uber-rare Gold Franz pickups, and an old style tailpiece.Of course, I realize, these are just my oppinions, and probably not shared by most. I have played a few over the years and they were quite nice.As you said, something like an ES-350 or and ES-175 but from John's shop, and no more expensive than laminated Gibsons, etc. keith This one has some serious weirdness going on: This one started out as a 50s White Falcon, but then John D'Angelico worked some magic on it.

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